News…

MOUNDSVILLE, W.Va. – Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex in Moundsville will conclude  its 2015 monthly lecture and film series at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 17, with a documentary film titled “The Real George Washington.” The 50-minute film is free and open to the public.

Visitors are invited to join archaeologists and historians as they apply innovative research and forensic techniques to shed new light on George Washington in his roles as founding father, leader of the Continental Army and first president of the United States. The researchers discover the ruins of Washington’s childhood home, then explore his role as a spymaster using secret codes and messages written in invisible ink during the American Revolution. An archived letter reveals possible evidence of a lost love, and forensic investigators recreate Washington’s face, not as it is portrayed in idealized works of art, but as he appeared in real life, using clues including his famous false teeth and an actual cast of his face.

The film was produced by the National Geographic Society and aired on the National Geographic Channel. 

For more information about activities and programs at Grave Creek Mound, contact Andrea Keller, cultural program coordinator, at (304) 843-4128 or [email protected] or visit www.facebook.com/gravecreekmound and www.twitter.com/gravecreekmound.

Operated by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex features one of the largest conical burial mounds built by the Adena people between 250 – 150 B.C. and ranks as one of the largest earthen mortuary mounds anywhere in the world. Exhibits and displays in the Delf Norona Museum interpret what is known about the lives of these prehistoric people and the construction of the mound. The complex also houses the West Virginia Archaeological Research and Collections Management Facility. The Delf Norona Museum, located at 801 Jefferson Avenue, is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. It is closed Sunday and Monday.

Operated by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex features one of the largest conical burial mounds built by the Adena people between 250 – 150 B.C. and ranks as one of the largest earthen mortuary mounds anywhere in the world. Exhibits and displays in the Delf Norona Museum interpret what is known about the lives of these prehistoric people and the construction of the mound. The complex also houses the West Virginia Archaeological Research and Collections Management Facility. The Delf Norona Museum, located at 801 Jefferson Avenue, is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. It is closed Sunday and Monday.

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